There’s a lot happening in our backyard

See the potential, view the #1000soflocalsolutions.

Photo: djpmapleferryman, https://www.flickr.com/photos/63319497@N00/3154711843.
Leading golf courses to conserve biodiversity
Recovery from Black Saturday bushfires
Healthier reef through alliance
Grazier users of the NRM Spatial Hub say it can measurably improve their properties’ productivity, profitability and sustainability.
New superfood? Kakadu Plums

4 days ago

East Gippsland Catchment Management Authority

This innocuous looking plant is Sea Spurge, Euphorbia paralias. An invasive beach weed, it can produce up to 5000 salt-tolerant seeds that can survive for years on ocean currents that spread them from beach to beach. A sea spurge colony is nothing if not persistent and can spread rapidly, displacing the native vegetation and disrupting many native species including endangered shorebirds - think hooded plovers, little terns, oystercatchers - that use open sand spits for nesting.
Protecting the Wilderness Coast and the inland shores of the Gippsland Lakes is a priority for a number of our partners including Parks Victoria, East Gippsland Landcare Network and Friends of the Gippsland Lakes Parks & Reserves - FOGL.
Members of Lakes Entrance Community Landcare are on a mission to remove Sea Spurge in their patch of East Gippy, one plant at a time. Having engaged an expert consultant to provide insights into the plant and armed with information, the volunteers make regular trips to different locations, including Cunninghame Arm and Rigby Island, clearing large swathes of the weeds in a single working bee.
A huge thank you to everyone who recognises the importance of removing these invasive little shrubs and have committed to do something about it.

Threatened Species Commissioner, Landcare Victoria, Far East Victoria Landcare, Nungurner Landcare Group, Love Our Lakes

#workingtogether #lookingafterourenvironment #1000soflocalsolutions
... See MoreSee Less

This innocuous looking plant is Sea Spurge, Euphorbia paralias. An invasive beach weed, it can produce up to 5000 salt-tolerant seeds that can survive for years on ocean currents that spread them from beach to beach. A sea spurge colony is nothing if not persistent and can spread rapidly, displacing the native vegetation and disrupting many native species including endangered shorebirds - think hooded plovers, little terns, oystercatchers - that use open sand spits for nesting.
Protecting the Wilderness Coast and the inland shores of the Gippsland Lakes is a priority for a number of our partners including Parks Victoria, East Gippsland Landcare Network and Friends of the Gippsland Lakes Parks & Reserves - FOGL.
Members of Lakes Entrance Community Landcare are on a mission to remove Sea Spurge in their patch of East Gippy, one plant at a time. Having engaged an expert consultant to provide insights into the plant and armed with information, the volunteers make regular trips to different locations, including Cunninghame Arm and Rigby Island, clearing large swathes of the weeds in a single working bee.
A huge thank you to everyone who recognises the importance of removing these invasive little shrubs and have committed to do something about it.

Threatened Species Commissioner, Landcare Victoria, Far East Victoria Landcare, Nungurner Landcare Group, Love Our Lakes

#workingtogether #lookingafterourenvironment #1000soflocalsolutions

Comment on Facebook

Cass Booth Shamis Law

Sea-Spurge removal December 2016....

Great work..will keep my eyes open.

And more recently

Hagan Brightman

+ View more comments

Load more

56 NRM regional organisations

Click the map to find your NRM regional organisation.

250px